In The News 02/19/2010

NURSING AND COMPUTERS: THE INEVITABLE MOVE TOWARDS ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS (EHR)

Nursing and computers have not always been a perfect mix. Typically, nurses try to get away from new computer systems as much as possible. However, it is an inevitable workflow evolution in today’s hospitals. Read more…

 

MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING

If you are interested in becoming a medical billing and coding specialist, another field you might want to consider would be Nursing Informatics.  There are many similarities between nursing informatics and medical billing and coding.  For instance, nursing informatics is in the medical industry, but does not carry the burden of customer service.  Also, nursing informatics is a technical job that is carried out in an office or some work out of their homes.  It is not necessary for them to be present in the hospital or doctors office to perform their jobs.  The demand for nursing informatics is growing rapidly, like medical billing and coding, due to the new expectations placed on the medical field by the Federal Government.  Since the aim is to have all patient information accessible on line, there has been rapid growth in these two industries.  It would be impossible for medical records to be electronically accessible without either medical billing or coding, or nursing informatics. Read more…

 

ANIA-Caring Merge into a single organization

Falls Church, VA. – The American Nursing Informatics Association (ANIA) and CARING, both nationally recognized non-profit Nursing Informatics organizations, announced their January 1, 2010 merger into a new entity, ANIA-CARING. The combined organization, with 3000+ membership in 50 states and 34 countries, is of the largest associations of its kind in the country.  

For more information, view their website at:  http://www.ania-caring.org

 

 AT HOME WITH THE UPWARDLY MOBILE

Treating patients at home requires mobile access to data. A few trusts are learning how to make this work

  • Tracey Caldwell

Smart Healthcare, Wednesday 17 February 2010 09.00 GMT

That’s all write: a digipen user completing a maternity visit form. Pen strokes are recorded electronically and sent through a mobile device to a record system. Photo: Anoto Read more…

 

LOOKING FORWARD: HEALTH CARE AND THE FUTURE OF NURSING CAREERS

What does the future look like for nursing careers? It is predicted that in the next ten to twenty years, things might be quite different from how they currently stand. As new technologies, treatments and drugs, shifts in health care policies, insurance policies, limited healthcare professionals especially nurses, indications are that the health care profession may have to reinvent itself. For instance, with advancements in technology, many functions could be automated. For instance, patient records and documentation, smart beds that can monitor patients vital signs, use of bar codes, and automated medicine carts could conceivably be used to save time and reduce errors in medication dispensing. Also voice-activated technologies would cut down the need to write down many things. Tasks such as serving meals could be taken taken over by trained aides to free up nurses to provide a human touch to their patients. Read more…

 

VIRGINIA GETS MILLIONS FOR ELECRONIC HEALTH DATA

Virginia will receive $24 million in federal money during the next four years to improve the exchange of electronic health information. Read more…

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One Response to “In The News 02/19/2010”

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